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Greek Life FAQs & Terminology

    FAQs

    How many fraternities and sororities are there at Saint Leo University?
    There are three difference councils which represent a total of 14 organizations; in total Saint Leo has seven fraternities and seven sororities. We have national organizations, which can be found across the country, and local chapters ,which are unique to Saint Leo University.

    What are Greeks?
    Greeks is the term used to refer to the sororities and fraternities on campus. They were originally were called Greeks because of the Greek letters used to designate each group. Greeks were groups formed on college campuses to promote leadership and scholarship while instilling a sense of community among members.

    Where is the Greek Life Office located? 
    Greek Life is part of the Office of Student Activities and is open from 8:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. The office is located on the first floor of the Student Activities Building, room #111. To contact Greek Life, call (352) 588-8266.

    Will joining Greek Life affect my grades?
    Going Greek should affect your grades in a positive way. Greek Life has a strong focus on academics and have GPA requirements to join. Some chapters have mandatory study hours, and offer academic resources such as tutors.

    What kind of financial obligations are there?
    Joining Greek Life is both a time and financial commitment. Dues vary according to chapters and councils. Feel free to inquire about each chapter’s financial obligations during recruitment or informational sessions. 

    What are the requirements to join Greek Life at Saint Leo?
    Saint Leo University requires all students interested in joining a fraternity or sorority to have a minimum of 12 Saint Leo credit hours and a minimum of a 2.5 GPA.

    How time consuming is joining a fraternity and sorority?
    There is not a minimum or maximum amount of time that an individual must spend with a fraternity or sorority. Students may be asked to attend several meetings each week, but each chapter is different. Through involvement with the chapter, students will learn to better manage their time, balance academics, work, and any other commitments they have, and grow as an individual.  Members often find that being active in a fraternity or sorority is well worth the time that they put into it.

    What does Greek Life provide that no other organization does?
    The transition into college life is one of the biggest transitions in an individual’s life. Joining a fraternity or sorority can help make the transition easier by offering a home away from home. Greek Life provides an opportunity to create lifelong friendships with members of all ages, including alumni. Greek Life promote brotherhood/sisterhood, leadership, scholarship, philanthropy, and financial responsibility.

    How do I know if joining a fraternity or sorority is right for me?
    The only way to really know if joining a fraternity or sorority is right for you is to go through recruitment, get to know the members on campus, and research individual organizations.  Once you find your home, you will never look back!

    I heard that all Greek Life does is party and drink, is that true? 
    No, this is not true. While there is a social aspect to sorority and fraternity life, it is not the primary focus of chapters. In addition to social functions, fraternity and sorority members participate in philanthropic activities, other clubs and organizations, and other co-curricular activities that benefit the campus and local community.

    How can I learn more about Greek Life?
    You can learn more about Greek Life by visiting the sites below: 
    • http://npcwomen.dynamic.omegafi.com/ 
    • http://www.nalfo.org/ 
    • http://www.nicindy.org/ 
    • http://www.nphchq.org/


    Terminology

    Active: An initiated member of a fraternity or sorority.
    Alumna/Alumnus: Member of a sorority or fraternity who has graduated.
    Bid: A formal invitation to become a member of a Greek Letter Organization.
    Big: Short for “big sister” or “big brother”; an active member who serves as a mentor for new members.
    Brother: A term used by members of a fraternity to refer to one another.
    Call/Chant: Audible sounds used by members based on the organizations to acknowledge other members. Non-members are not permitted to use the call/chant.
    Colony: A new fraternity or sorority that is awaiting official recognition from their national to have a chapter at a campus.
    Chapter: A recognized unit of a national or international fraternity or sorority.
    Culturally Based Fraternal Organizations (CBFOs): Fraternities and sororities that are culturally based, celebrating identities such as race, ethnicity, and nationality.
    Dry Recruitment: Refers to the period of time before and during the recruitment process in which serving and/or the presence of alcohol is prohibited.
    Formal Recruitment: Predetermined time span at Saint Leo University during the Spring semester in which the  majority of recruitment occurs each year.
    Founders: The founding members of a Greek Letter Organization.
    Fraternity: A group of men bonded together by ritual that contains the founding principles, ideals, and aspirations of the group.
    Governing Council: Saint Leo has three governing councils that act as a liaison between organizations within it and the university.
    Greek: A member of a fraternity or sorority.
    Interfraternity  Council  (IFC): The governing body of the fraternities at Saint Leo.
    Informal Recruitment: An open recruitment period where bids may be extended and accepted at any time. This practice differs between councils.  
    Initiation: A formal ceremony where new members receive lifelong membership privileges into the organization.
    Legacy:  A potential new member whose grandparent, parent or sibling is a member of a Fraternity/Sorority.
    Line: A term used by CBFOs to name a new member class.
    National/Headquarters: Governing body and staff of each national fraternity or sorority.
    National  Panhellenic Council (NPC): 26 international sororities belong to this group which guides policies, practices and educational programs for collegiate sorority women.
    National  Pan-Hellenic  Council (NPHC): Nationally, the governing body for the nine historically African-American  fraternities and sororities.
    Neophyte (Neo): A new member of a culturally based organization.
    New Member: A person who has accepted a bid but is not yet initiated.
    New Member Presentation : A formal presentation of a new line to campus. Usually done by CBFOs in a public forum after members have been initiated.
    Panhellenic Council: The governing body for Panhellenic sororities at Saint Leo University.
    Potential New Member (PNM): A term used to refer to a prospective new member of a fraternity or a sorority.
    Philanthropy: A cause for which a Greek Letter Organization raises money.
    Prophyte: A term used by CBFOs to refer to an older member in their chapter.
    Recruitment: A formal week of scheduled events to help enlist new members.
    Recruitment Counselor (Rho Chi): A Panhellenic representative who guides PNMs through the formal recruitment process.
    Ritual: The traditional rites and ceremonies of a fraternity or sorority; generally private and known only to initiated members.
    Silence: A  period of time when conversation and contact between potential new members and Panhellenic sorority active members and alumnae are strictly limited by recruitment guidelines.
    Sister: A term used by members of a sorority to refer to one another.
    Sorority: A group of women bonded together by ritual that contains the founding principles, ideals and aspirations of the group.
    Stepping: A historically African-American tradition that is a form of communication and storytelling by synchronized hand/foot movements.
    Strolling: A line routine by members of CBFOs organization; usually done at yardshows and stepshows.
    Unified Greek Council (UGC): The governing body of CBFOs at Saint Leo. Includes National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) and Multicultural Greek Council (MGC).


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