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LEAD Scholars - Class/Cohort Information

    Class Specific Requirements

     

    First Year Scholars : Rising Leaders 

    • Themes: acclimating to college leadership and initiating leadership roles
    • Tasks: 
      • Explore campus/community involvement and identify leadership role(s) for sophomore year
      • The First Year as a LEAD Scholar is designed to test the waters and begin building your leadership legacy at Saint Leo. This is your opportunity to attend clubs and organizations outside of your comfort zone, attend "random" events and activities and begin thinking about where and why YOU want to make an impact.

        You might consider:
        • What is your passion?
        • What TYPE of leadership are you drawn towards?
        • What campus or community involvement will make you happy?
        • What campus or community involvement will give you a better college experience?
        • What campus or community involvement will benefit you post-graduation?
        • How much time do you have to devote to a leadership position?
        • What attracts you about leadership opportunities? 
        First Year Scholars will design and complete a leadership plan outlining potential leadership opportunities and development over their collegiate career. This leadership plan will be due by April 15th.

        To assist in this developmental year, each First Year Scholar will have an upper-class mentor in the form of a Junior LEAD scholar. These mentor/mentee pairs will meet at least once a month. While there is no formal topical information to cover, you will be required to submit a short reflection after each meet-up using the contact form below. Things you might want to ask/utilize your mentee for:
        • learning about what involvement opportunities exist on campus
        • having someone to go to events with
        • asking questions about the challenges and opportunities related to moving into leadership positions in your freshman or sophomore year
        • getting to know the campus better
        • getting to know the local community better
        • Meet with junior mentor at least once a month
        Mentee meet-ups can take many forms! Including but not limited to:
        • meet up before or after an ELLO or LEAD Workshop that you attend together
        • grab a booth & eat together in the dining hall
        • doing a brown-bag lunch discussion picnic-style outside (once the weather cools off)
        • go to a fun campus event together - like Bingo or a Comedian
        • go off campus for a meal or something fun like mini-golf
        • hang out at the lake

        Sophomore Scholars : Active Leaders 

        • Themes: transition into leadership roles/begin to hone leadership skill set
        • Tasks:
          • Participate in at least one leadership role in campus or community
          • Design and implement LEADALL community service as sophomore cohort

        The Sophomore Year as a LEAD Scholar is designed to begin actively applying leadership skills and assuming leadership positions either on Saint Leo University's campus or in the local community. Sophomore scholars are encouraged to explore leadership opportunities that match their own interests and skill-sets but will challenge them in new ways. Opportunities abound and include but are not limited to: ministry and church leadership, clubs and organizations, Student Government, Orientation, Residence Life, Greek Life ... the sky is the limit! This is your opportunity to apply/nominate/volunteer for leadership roles and reflect on the interplay of your emerging leadership skills, growing leadership experience and developing ideas about leadership-in-practice and peer-leadership.

        One sophomore will be selected by the LEAD Scholar group at the Senior Send-Off in their sophomore year to serve as the President-Elect in their junior year (to shadow the President) and will then assume the LEAD Scholar Presidency their senior year.

        In addition, the Sophomore Scholars will be responsible for working together as the Sophomore LEAD Scholars cohort to design and facilitate the LEADALL community service each semester. All LEAD Scholars will participate in the community service event, but the planning and implementation will be managed by the Sophomore Scholars.

        Things the Sophomore Scholars might choose to consider (not an exhaustive list or checklist-just a resource!) when planning LEADALL Community Service are:

        • service site and purpose (where will we serve and why?)
        • logistics (date, time, duration, reservations needed, maintenance tickets, approvals needed, etc.)
        • communication amongst LEAD scholars (what does that look like? reporting structure)
        • timeline (when do things need to get accomplished? how will that be accomplished?
        • accountability (how will Sophomore scholars hold one another accountable for task completion/involvement?)
        • resources available and needed (if you need items or funds not provided, how will you procure them? what if procurement attempts fail? what is the backup?)
        • marketing (how will the event be advertised? while LEADALL events are designed & required for LEAD Scholars, we want them to be open opportunities for the entire campus)
        • assessment (how will you know if the service was successful or not? how can assessment be used to improve planning community service events in the future?)

        Junior Scholars : Mentoring Leaders 

        • Themes: mentoring first year scholars and adjusting leadership skill set based on leadership experiences 
        • Tasks:
          • Meet with first year mentee at least once a month
          • Co-host at least one (1) LEAD scholars workshop

        Junior LEAD Scholars begin the transition from focusing on their own leadership skill-development and experience and begin mentoring and training others. Leadership is not just about doing, and as an organization on a University campus the educational component of leadership is front and center!  Junior Scholars spend the year developing other leaders via mentorships and LEAD Scholar workshops.  A current junior is selected at the end of their sophomore year to serve as President-Elect and will spend their junior year shadowing the LEAD Scholars President before assuming the presidency the following year.

        LEAD WORKSHOPS
        Each junior will be responsible for leading or co-leading one LEAD Workshop in the academic year. Junior Scholars with busy spring terms are encouraged to complete this requirement in the fall. Junior Scholars may host or lead multiple workshops, if they desire, but will only be held accountable for leading/hosting one. A minimum of four LEAD workshops will be offered in each of the following months: October, November, February & March). Please note September and January only have one workshop each as it is built into the Overnight/Mini Retreat and there are no workshops in December/April to allow Scholars to focus on finals.  Juniors may choose to work independently, to pair up with each other, to co-present with an outside leader (faculty/staff/guest presenter/other student leader) or work with the LEAD Scholars adviser to host a workshop. No more than two presenters should be attached to any one workshop. Responsibilities for hosting/co-hosting a workshop include:

        • Coming up with a topic that addresses leadership skills not already covered at a LEAD Workshop in that academic year -or- which covers leadership skills already covered at a LEAD Workshop in the same academic year in a new and different way
        • Submitting a LEAD Scholars Workshop Proposal
          • must be submitted by the 25th of the month prior to implementation (for example: must be submitted by October 25 if planning to present in November); must include ALL documents/presentation materials in addition to outline
        • Holding the Workshop as Proposed 
        • Monthly Workshop Assignments
          • August (no workshops or ELLOs; kickoff & mentee meetings only)
          • September (only one workshop for month; led by adviser & held during Overnight Retreat!)
            • Branding Your Leadership
          • October
            • Andrea Lopez: The Human Knot
            • Celine Palmer: The Art of Confrontation
          • November
            • Rayonia Slater: The Danger of a Single Story
            • Jeanine Ramirez: What Kind of Leader Are You?
            • Mary Peacock: The Art of Communication
          • December (no workshops; concentrate on finals!)
          • January (one one workshop for month; led by adviser & held during Mini-Retreat)
          • February
            • Alejandra Rincon: Technology in the Workplace
            • Sarah Walterman: You've Got This
          • March
            • LeAnn Winslow: Effective Communication for Leaders
            • Shantae Whyte: Free Food Free Thought
            • Tihana Hadjinak: The Guide to Studying Abroad
          • April (no workshops, attend Recognition Celebration & focus on finals)


        As MENTORS, each Junior will have a First Year Scholar to mentor. Junior Scholars will help their mentee begin to explore collegiate and community leadership opportunities and transition to leadership within our community. These mentor/mentee pairs will meet at least once a month. While there is no formal topical information to cover, you will be required to submit a short reflection after each meet-up using the contact form below. Things you might want to help your mentee explore:

        • learning about what involvement opportunities exist on campus
        • having someone to go to events with
        • asking questions about the challenges and opportunities related to moving into leadership positions in their freshman or sophomore year
        • getting to know the campus better
        • getting to know the local community better


        Mentee meet-ups can take many forms! Including but not limited to:

        • meet up before or after an ELLO or LEAD Workshop that you attend together
        • grab a booth & eat together in the dining hall
        • doing a brown-bag lunch discussion picnic-style outside (once the weather cools off)
        • go to a fun campus event together - like Bingo or a Comedian
        • go off campus for a meal or something fun like mini-golf
        • hang out at the lake

        Senior Scholars : Leading Leaders 

        • Themes: advanced leadership skills, transitioning leadership positions and roles (student to graduate) 
        • Tasks:
          • Assume leadership role (officer, advisory board or committee chair) within LEAD Scholars program
          • Design and implement LEADALL campus wide programs as senior cohort
        The Senior Year as a LEAD Scholar is designed to actively lead other leaders! In this year, our Senior Scholars assume a formal leadership role within the LEAD Scholars organization (officer, advisory board member or committee chair) and ensure the growth and development of the LEAD Scholars program. It is also a year for our Senior Scholars to begin final transition out of their university campus involvement and into their post-graduate lives.

        LEAD SCHOLARS LEADERSHIP ROLES
        There are three categories of leadership roles that Senior LEAD Scholars may assume within the LEAD Scholars program their senior year:
        1. PRESIDENT: there are only two officer positions within the LEAD Scholars organization, a president (current senior) and president -elect (current junior). The President is responsible for working directly with the president-elect and the LEAD Scholars Advisor in the holistic planning and implementation of the LEAD Scholars program. The president mentors and develops the president-elect throughout the year and the presidency is passed at the Senior Send-Off event. The president also sits on the Advisory Board.
        2. ADVISORY BOARD: three current seniors (with the president and president-elect serving as the fourth and fifth members) will serve as the LEAD Scholars Advisory Board. This group serves as the voice of the LEAD Scholars group, provides feedback for program growth and development and serves as a judiciary council for peer accountability within the LEAD Scholars program when needed. 
        3. PROGRAM COMMITTEE CHAIRS: the remaining seniors serve as program committee chairs for developing the LEADALL campus wide programs each semester. The Program Committee Chairs will work together as a cohort to design the program committee positions and structure each year.  The committee structure will have it's own reporting format (as determined by the seniors) with one person designated at the top of the communication pyramid who will provide the leadership team (advisor, president and president-elect) with progress updates. Within the reporting structure and committee structure designed by the LEAD scholars, the scholars will hold each other accountable for contributions and execution of the program.

        Program Committee Requirements:
        • it must occur in November (fall) or February (spring)
        • it will be planned and led by Senior LEAD scholars
        • every LEAD scholar will attend
        • the topic/theme must relate to leadership (directly or indirectly)

        Things the Senior Scholars/Committee Chairs might choose to consider (not an exhaustive list or checklist-just a resource!) are:
        • topic/theme
        • format (lecture, interactive, rotating stations, experiential, combination, etc.)
        • logistics (date, time, duration, reservations needed, maintenance tickets, approvals needed, etc.)
        • communication amongst LEAD scholars (what does that look like? reporting structure)
        • timeline (when do things need to get accomplished? how will that be accomplished?
        • accountability (how will scholars hold one another accountable to task completion/involvement?)
        • components (what needs to be included?)
        • resources available and needed (if you need items or funds not provided, how will you procure them? what if procurement attempts fail? what is the backup?)
        • marketing (how will the event be advertised?)
        • purpose (what could the student population benefit from related to leadership? how can we make it worth students' time?)
        • assessment (how will you know if the program has been successful or not? how will program attendance be monitored? how will you use assessment data to improve programming for the future?)
        A copy of the Senior Scholar assigned roles and structure will be developed by the Senior Scholar cohort and provided to the President /Advisor at the 2017-2018 Kick-Off meeting.
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