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Saint Leo 360 Podcast

Episode 25: Dr. Angela Manos, 32-Year Army Veteran & Professor of Criminal Justice

Posted by Greg Lindberg on November 10, 2020
Podcast-Episode-25

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Speaker 1:
Saint Leo 360: A 360 degree overview of the Saint Leo University community.

Greg Lindberg:
Welcome to another episode of the Saint Leo 360 podcast. My name is Greg Lindberg. On this episode, we are speaking with one of our esteemed faculty members who teaches in our criminal justice programs. And she is an assistant professor of criminal justice in our Center for Online Learning. And she's also a retired Army Colonel and long time member of the Army - Dr. Angela Manos - welcome to the podcast.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Well thank you very much I'm pleased to be here with you today.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely, I'm really looking forward to this conversation and diving into your background, and we definitely have plenty to cover here so I really appreciate it. So first off, Dr. Manos, if you could just give us a little brief bio about yourself - where you were born, where you grew up, and your early years.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Well my dad was in the Navy, he was a Navy warrant officer, and all the children were born in different states, so we really didn't claim any state. And then, once my brother was old enough he went in the Army, my other brother went in the Marines, and then I went in the Army.

Greg Lindberg:
Wow.

Dr. Angela Manos:
[crosstalk 00:01:45] we came home until we retired, and my father's deceased now, and I retired here in Florida. So I guess I found my home in Florida.

Greg Lindberg:
Gotcha. And so I'd imagine it was because of your father and family military service that kind of inspired you to enlist yourself?

Dr. Angela Manos:
Right, I mean, my whole family was in it, and one thing my father said to me - I remember when I told him I wanted to do military - he said, "The only thing you cannot do is join the Navy and go on a ship." That was a long time ago when he didn't think that was a very bright idea, and of course now, women are doing everything.

Greg Lindberg:
Wow, interesting.

Dr. Angela Manos:
When I enlisted, in 1979 - oh, God, it was a hundred years ago! I was the first female to train and - what's it called - the single training with a man. So, it was the first time that men and women were housed together and did all the same training together at the Policy Corps, Military Police Corps.

Greg Lindberg:
Right.

Dr. Angela Manos:
It was quite an experience, quite a learning experience. What you actually found was that the soldiers didn't have a problem with it at all, we just wanted to survive together. We didn't care. But I think it was a little bit harder for leadership than it was for the soldiers and staff. We just wanted to get along day by day.

Greg Lindberg:
Interesting. And I'm curious, how were women viewed at the time in the military just thinking back to when you initially got it?

Dr. Angela Manos:
We were considered the weaker sex of course and were given the admin jobs and it was typically to what you see in society. But one of the things the Army has always done to officers - not just the Army, but all the services - is step out ahead of society. So, when when I went in to the Military Police Corps, and they had not had women in Military Police Corps- So, women were separate from the men before. They lived in different barracks, they trained in different areas, and eventually they would all come together on a cause somewhere and work together. But, the way this was set up was that there was one-stop unit training. You went through basic together and you went through your unit training together, and then you were sent to your unit together. And you were always mixed with the male and female, you weren't separated.

Greg Lindberg:
I see, makes sense.

Dr. Angela Manos:
I was very old, old in the sense compared to most people. I was 25 when I went in. And most of the people I was around were 18 and 19 years old. So, it was a little bit easier for me than I think the younger ones. And my daddy kinda told me what to expect, and so had the recruiter. But I had been under DeKalb County Police Department in DeKalb County Georgia before I went in. So I had seen how it was in the civilian world in a man's world. So, it wasn't a complete transition in the sense that I knew what was coming. I was told it would be different, but there really wasn't a lot of difference at first. And it all worked out fine. Now I look at young women are going to raider school, the women are flying the fighter aircraft, and there's not anything that women aren't doing. And a lot of people ahead of me set that stage that allowed me to do my part and then those that followed along to do their part. We showed you that change can be painful and it can be challenging, but it can be very good for society as a whole.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure, yeah. That's a great point. Let's dive a little more into specific jobs, specific duties that you had while serving in the Army.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Well I was enlisted for three years, and I was just a regular MP. And actually what I did though, they saw that I had already had my Bachelor's Degree when I went in from Georgia State. When we'd stay at the MP school, at that time it was in Alabama, and I call it MP school, and I topped right through criminal law. The thing is a typical Military Police would need to work on the streets. And I did that for about three years, and then my Commander called me in and said, "Do you want to be an Officer?" And I said, "Sure!" I mean the money's like ten times more-

Greg Lindberg:
Right!

Dr. Angela Manos:
And it'd be nice to be one! And he recommended me, and I appeared on a Board, and I got accepted. And so in 1981, I went to what they used to call Ft. Benning School for Boys, which was an officer candidates school, and now of course it's just the Officer Candidates School, not the Ft. Benning School for Boys. And everybody goes to that, that became the norm as well. And everybody attends that school and becomes the MP's commission to guard admission in the Army. It was probably one of the roughest things I did, but I am glad that I did it because I think that it allowed me to help a lot more people in the Military with my leadership than I would have been able to if I enlisted.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure, I see. And then I do understand that you did serve some deployments, correct?

Dr. Angela Manos:
Yeah, I am an Officer. Well, I went to a lot of places. I didn't stay a long time. The longest one I stayed in was my last one, which was Afghanistan for 18 months. But I'd been to Somalia, to Haiti, Macedonia, Kosovo. Well, they're third-world countries that were having serious problems with sickness and no food, and no leadership, and it was just so sad. A lot of orphanages and the poor children were starving to death and we were doing the best we could to get them fed, and tried to bring some kind of peace to the countries. And you just had to remember that you couldn't make it all right overnight, but everything you did made a difference for the better and to just keep trying to do that and to those around you.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Like I said, I was older, so I think it was a lot easier for me. There were a lot of young, young soldiers - 18, 19 - you know, their first time away from home, who were put into these environments and a lot of what I did was spent time with them trying to get them to understand. They may not see the big picture of what's going on, but there is someone that knows what's going on, the big picture, and their role was very important. And that no matter how hard it was to watch or to participate in, it was necessary to get to where we needed to go, and what those people needed. And after a couple months or so they'd start to see some improvement in the population, the way the population was living.

Greg Lindberg:
And I'm sure that was pretty rewarding knowing that you and your comrades were involved in helping those people.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Yeah, and the kids reach to know you, they'd come up to the fence line, they'd tell you their name. They'd do the high-five and we'd give them candy bars. Just little things like that motivated you and kept you going to be able to do that. And the kids would chase us to our vehicles. And the kids in Somalia could run faster than our vehicles, and they wore flip-flops! It was so funny, it was so funny to watch them. You just had to always tell yourself: "I'm here because God wants me here, and I'm going to do my best to do what's right and stand for my values." And as long as you never forgot that, you couldn't go wrong.

Greg Lindberg:
Yeah, that's a great outlook. I'm curious, how did it change your perspective, visiting those third-world countries knowing the freedoms we take for granted in the United States?

Dr. Angela Manos:
I guess it's kind of disheartening in the sense that I saw how bad other people have it. I mean just how horrific their everyday life is. You hear the stories about them walking miles to get clean water, they don't have clo- I mean all that stuff's true when you see those commercials on TV. So many people don't believe that that's how these people live, and it is how they live! And people get shot for going to school and all that happens!

Dr. Angela Manos:
So when I'd come home to our country which is civilized and has these group opportunities and then can't seem to stabilize itself, it's really disheartening. Because I think we've got God, we've got a good country, we've got all these wonderful things in our lives, and yet we still attack each other. One of the things you learn in those other countries, they don't look at you as any different from them, you're all one. And they all work together as a general population. And we'd go into Afghanistan - course, they're a different story because you have the Taliban competing against the Afghan people - but they worked together. That's why they're so successful!

Dr. Angela Manos:
Now, I see here we're having the Black Lives Matter- which I think is a great thing except, instead of protesting, people are rioting. We have the right to protest, so I think we should take advantage of that and not use it as a stepping stone to actually destroying property and hurting other individuals, or doing those kinds of things. And that makes me sad when I think about what other people are facing. That we don't appreciate what we have to that point.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure.

Dr. Angela Manos:
It just makes me sad because I sit and think about there and here and what's going on now. But I think we're a strong country. I think we'll come through it. Because we've gone through a lot of changes in this country. And I believe thoroughly that God knows what he's doing, and we'll come out on top. But I think that we'll have some growing pains, if you will, in that process.

Greg Lindberg:
Yeah, that's very well said. Just coming back to serving in Afghanistan - if you could share a little more about that experience.

Dr. Angela Manos:
I was there 18 months. I was a senior mentor to the Minister of Interior, which equates to our Secretary of Defense. He was responsible for the security of the country, interior country. And so what he had to do was stand up- they wanted a national police force. So, their police all went to the same- first we stood up a police academy, got the material they needed to know, then put the policemen through that, put them in a uniform, put them out at the different points they were going to and told them what to do and how to do it.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And of course there were a lot of challenges in there. One, you didn't know if you were talking to someone who was really for the country or if you were talking to a member of the Taliban. And two, they'd always been tribal people. They live in tribes, they're still tribal people! And they handled problems in their tribes. So when someone would try to come in from outside their tribe and do something it made them very angry. So it was a real challenge. We were run out of many an area -physically run out- of many an area because they did not welcome us in there. But there were a lot of places that did work.

Dr. Angela Manos:
But we would take soldiers, policemen, and put them on point, and no one would see them again maybe for a couple months because there's only one road that went around in the country, and in the winter you couldn't go around it. So you couldn't get to them in the winter. And they would lose their feet and hands and some of them died from frostbite. That's how rugged the country is. You couldn't get across a mountain on the road at certain times of the year. And those are the kinds of thing that we don't deal with. I think about they figured out how to do it and these soldiers or policemen would just go into their place and say, "Okay, here's where I'm gonna be." They give them their food, their beds, weapons and ammunition, and say, "We'll see you in a few months." I just couldn't imagine. And they have no idea what's going to happen to them over the next few months.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And they were right on the border with Iran, and that was a challenge with Afghanistan. You got China on one side, Russia on one side, Pakistan on one side, and Iran on the other side. There is nowhere to go.

Greg Lindberg:
Right.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And that's why it's such a valuable country. Any of those countries would love to be able to traverse right through that country.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And of course they can't do that. The people are wonderful. I personally- I spent 18 months there- and most of the time I was with the Afghan people, the Minister, I was very subtle with troops. The people were just so kind. They're very religious, as you know. And I would talk to the ones that spoke English about the religion, and their beliefs about Mary, and Joseph, and Jesus is the same as ours. So it was interesting talking to them about what they believed in.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And of course, their fight's over who's the actual blood line of Jesus. It was so interesting to realize these people were so close in that land, that country, that who has the actual blood of Jesus running through them, is who they want to be the leader of their country. And you think about- oh my goodness. That's amazing. That that country feels that close to Jesus Christ. It was interesting listening to their stories and looking at the pictures that they had, and everything that's going on. I just hope someday they do find peace.

Dr. Angela Manos:
They have a big heroin problem. Of course, we get 97% of the heroin that they have.

Greg Lindberg:
Hmm.

Dr. Angela Manos:
That's a big problem for them. But if you took away all the heroin they use, the country would die. That's how it supports itself.

Greg Lindberg:
Wow.

Dr. Angela Manos:
It's the typical thing about drugs. If you didn't have a buyer, you wouldn't need a supplier.

Greg Lindberg:
True, yeah.

Dr. Angela Manos:
It's one of those things where you can point your finger at them, but you're pointing it back at yourself or whoever is buying it.

Dr. Angela Manos:
But I love the people in general, and the children. But the thing is there you saw the children walking around with hardly any clothes on and they're barefooted in the dead of winter and the roads were one lane or no lane or dirt. It's got a long way to go. But it's got a city, I mean Kabul, the capital, it's been destroyed a lot of it from the bombings, but it's civilized I guess you would say.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure.

Dr. Angela Manos:
[crosstalk 00:21:46] Civilized. But every day a car blew up or a bus blew up or a building was blown up- well not every day, it could all the time. But what was amazing to me was that they could have a busload, it could blow up, and within 30 minutes they could have that street completely cleaned up. All the things that were in that bus, everything, gone. In 30 minutes you would have never known that there was a bomb there that exploded and lost all those people.

Greg Lindberg:
Hmm.

Dr. Angela Manos:
They were just so well prepared to deal with that. And then the people would be walking along, talking to each other, buying groceries or stuff, and I'm thinking: We could not do that, they're conditioned to that. In America, if that happened, I just don't think we could handle it the same way.

Greg Lindberg:
Yeah, that is fascinating.

Dr. Angela Manos:
It's sad that they are so accustomed to it.

Greg Lindberg:
Right. And once something like that happens, it's just such an everyday occurrence... Let's talk about some of the relationships or connections that you made while serving, and perhaps anyone that you are still friends with today and keep up with. What other people around you, kind of the impact they made on you.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Well, my dearest friend actually is deceased. He was my mentor.

Greg Lindberg:
Hmm.

Dr. Angela Manos:
For a long, long time. In the military, there's guys you respected, and your leaders. And even though he was out of the military and I was out of the military, I still called him "Sir." I would never use his first name. And he's deceased and I still today wouldn't use his first name.

Greg Lindberg:
Hmm.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And it wasn't just the officers, a lot of times it was the wives of the officers that you learned a lot from, too. Because they saw what they went through and understood things that I didn't understand because I didn't see that part of them or that part of their life. And I was an enlisted aide to the Deputy Chief of Staff of Operations to the Army and he works in the Pentagon. And I worked in the Pentagon three or four times-

Greg Lindberg:
Hmm.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And for about eight years total. And I met a lot of people there that I got very close to who had a lot of rank and were so smart. Those guys could take an issue and lay it out. An issue with multiple missions to it and lay it out and figure out what needed to be done and the steps to be taken. And most of the time they used the backward planning method, but they never stopped astounding me with what they could accomplish and what they could see, their vision.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And the one thing the Army's always done is- always done, since when I was enlisted- and it never changes. They always stood on their values just like Saint Leo. Everything was about the values. Everything was about the core values and about leadership. I think that has had a lot to do with the success and the movement of the military.

Dr. Angela Manos:
I mean the military, when they first had African Americans in the military they didn't live on post. They weren't allowed to live in military housing. I mean, Colin Powell, I don't know if you ever read his book, but if you haven't it'd be very interesting. It talks about his life as a solider in the military. And he ended up being the highest ranking military member!

Greg Lindberg:
Hmm.

Dr. Angela Manos:
As Chairman to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. But at one point, he wasn't even allowed to live in the houses! And he stayed. And then he made it that far. So you think about it, and you think that there's some people that run the organization-

Greg Lindberg:
No doubt about that.

Dr. Angela Manos:
But it's based on the values.

Greg Lindberg:
Yeah, and I'm so glad you mentioned the connection to Saint Leo in terms of our core values. That's great to hear.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Every time I teach. Every time I write to one of the soldiers or talk about our papers or whatever, I always talk about the values. When they get tired or feel like they're not gonna do it, you just gotta say, "Look, look. You got the values, you know you wanna do this. Give it all you got. And if you do that, you'll do well."

Greg Lindberg:
Sure.

Dr. Angela Manos:
It gives them some sense of security, and that's what values do for you.

Greg Lindberg:
[crosstalk 00:27:13]

Dr. Angela Manos:
It's a foundation to stand on.

Greg Lindberg:
Yeah, no question. I also understand that you did receive a Purple Heart, and I'm curious if you could explain the reason behind that and what that means to you.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Well, I was in a couple incidents, I was in a bombing. And then I lost most of my hearing in both my ears, so I have two hearing aids. And then I had a head injury. So I got a Purple Heart. I appreciate it, but there's so many people that got it- well they lost a leg, or an arm, or two legs or two arms or... You know, mine are invisible.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure.

Dr. Angela Manos:
So I don't see myself as... as... deserving I guess I would say as so many of the others. I mean there's just been so many really injured, injured people. And I do hate that I lost most of my hearing, cause I can't[inaudible 00:28:36] by just saying, "Huh?"

Greg Lindberg:
Right.

Dr. Angela Manos:
But I got hearing aids. But then again I felt good that I got a Combat Action Badge, because I was in combat. So people know that I really did serve my country. We wear those kinds of things to demonstrate that.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And I wear my Saint Leo mask, by the way, every time I go out.

Greg Lindberg:
Nice, we appreciate that. And just kind of reflecting on your overall experience in the military, what would you say are the big takeaways, what kind of life lessons did you learn?

Dr. Angela Manos:
You gotta depend on other people whether you want to or not. You gotta keep your chin up no matter how hard things are getting to be. You gotta- I said over and over- you gotta stand on your values, you cannot let them waiver at all. And if you do that, stand on that foundation, it may get shaky, you may feel a little shaky, but that foundation is not gonna crack, and you're gonna be fine. And any time I felt like, "I don't know if I can do this," many a times I felt afterwards: "God made that right. I shouldn't have been worried about that."

Greg Lindberg:
Yeah.

Dr. Angela Manos:
But that's such a nice feeling, to realize that. When that happens. God has saved me a number of times and those around me. So I've learned to really trust in God and trust that he knows what he's doing, and that he's gonna get us through all this thing that's going on: COVID-19, changes in our university. It's all going to be okay. And it may be bumpy, but it will be okay.

Greg Lindberg:
Yeah. That's a great outlook. And what kind of advice would you have for someone listening to this interview and is considering enlisting in the military. What kind of advice would you give that individual?

Dr. Angela Manos:
I would tell them make sure that's what they wanted to do and that their family was in it with them. Because they will need their company. It can be a very lonely place if they don't have a support system. Because they need to have that to be able to go, too. And again, that could be the Church that's their support system, doesn't have to be a particular person or a particular family member. It could be a Church member. They need to have some connected with the outside world that supports them.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure. That's great advice. And I understand you did serve for about 32 years in total?

Dr. Angela Manos:
Mm-hmm (affirmative)!

Greg Lindberg:
Wow. And just to wrap that up, thank you so much for your service.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Mm-hmm (affirmative),

Greg Lindberg:
We're very grateful to have someone of your caliber and experience to be able to teach our students.

Dr. Angela Manos:
I love it. I absolutely love it. It keeps me well, it keeps me sane!

Greg Lindberg:
Sure. And I did want to just briefly touch on your post-military life before we get into your teaching career. And again, I'm not sure how much you want to share but it's totally up to you. But I understand that you have had a service dog, that you've been involved with the Wounded Warrior Project, and if you could just elaborate a little more on some of those initiatives and experiences?

Dr. Angela Manos:
Every year it gets better and better with the Veterans Affairs, and the VA, helping Veterans adjust to coming back home. It's hard. I have PTSD and that's what my service dog is for. I wake up at night and still have the nightmares and many, many, many do. And again, that's when you wake up- I have a nightmare, I lay down and I say a prayer and be thankful that I'm where I am. It's one of those things where you want to share with people but you don't want to share with people. Because you don't want to get everybody around you sad.

Dr. Angela Manos:
But, I had the right people I talked to, the Wounded Warrior Project is a great organization that provides activities for Wounded Warriors to go out to do together to keep their strength up. The USO supports the soldiers. The department of Wounded Veteran's Organization- all of those help. You just have to make the effort to get involved with them, but they're doing more and more all the time. I estimate myself more than I used to. But that's one of the reasons I love my career so much, being a full-time online teacher at Saint Leo, was that I can still be helpful and learn myself and teach others and be giving and yet not have to do more than I can now

Greg Lindberg:
Sure, sure. I know you did mention earlier that you did attain your Bachelor's Degree before your military career, right?

Dr. Angela Manos:
Mm-hmm (affirmative) I got my doctorate degree from the University of Kansas in 1992 when I was stationed in Kansas. Then I m- where'd I go from Kansas? I think I went back to Washington D.C. and got put on a study program where the Army was looking at different programs and that kind of stuff. I was selected as a Commander, Installation Commander- it's like a Mayor- of Fort MacPherson, that's what it is, Fort MacPherson.

Greg Lindberg:
Hmm.

Dr. Angela Manos:
It's like being a Mayor. You have a fire department, police department, hospital, doctor, veterinary- I mean the whole thing, it's like a city. So, I went there and Saint Leo wanted a place to teach there. So of course I said yes, and after a while, that was 2003, or four, and I started teaching for them as an adjunct. When I finally fully retired in 2013, they made me a full-time faculty online, and I was the first one they had made a full-time faculty online. But I stayed in the Criminal Justice department and worked in answering to them. So it's been quite a few years.

Greg Lindberg:
Yeah.

Dr. Angela Manos:
That I've been with them. Quite a few years now.

Greg Lindberg:
Wow.

Dr. Angela Manos:
I don't even know to be honest with you exactly how many it's been. I know I've been full-time since 2013. I don't know how many years I taught before that.

Greg Lindberg:
Wow. Yeah, so it sounds like at least 15 or more total.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Yeah.

Greg Lindberg:
Very interesting.

Dr. Angela Manos:
I've always taught in Criminal Justice because that was obviously my field was Law Enforcement and Corrections, and I loved doing that. And I taught Young Leadership class, which I liked. I taught that when I taught the final class that they do when they put together a police department. And I really enjoyed Corrections with them. I really enjoy the Criminal Law, Due Process- they get very active in that one.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And the way I teach- I like the discussion part and getting them to talk and then answer them back. And I was really happy they added the Zoom classes. The possibility for seeing them one hour every week now. I've had two or three, I don't have a lot show up, and I'm hoping as time goes on more and more people will start coming to the Zoom classes. But anyway, we record them so they can look at them at their leisure. And what I'm hoping is that they see how successful they are, and then they'll start coming. And library comes on one of my days and teaches them how to use APA and the library and LibGuides and everything else. So they see that it's worthwhile.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure.

Dr. Angela Manos:
And I like to be very interactive with them.

Greg Lindberg:
That's great, yeah. I'm sure like you said, just the Zoom aspect and then actually being able to see the students and talk to them face-to-face, it's pretty powerful.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Mm-hmm (affirmative) I love it. Before I was doing the online Criminal Justice Association, where we just picked topics of interest and do presentations for the whole Association every few Thursdays. And I usually do that. And that one you know, that varies from how many people come to that or whatever. But I can use those in my Zoom classes too, though, so it's a great benefit for me.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure, yeah. And I have heard a lot of great things about that group. The Criminal Justice Association and how it really connects and strengthens those relationships among the online students.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Greg Lindberg:
What would you say, a prospective student who might be listening, what could they expect from an online program specifically a Criminal Justice program at Saint Leo?

Dr. Angela Manos:
I think that they can expect to learn what they need to know. And they can be very comfortable with asking questions and receiving the feedback that they need, because the people who teach, and I'll say this: the people who are in Criminal Justice love Criminal Justice. And I think it comes out in all the teachers in Criminal Justice. So they get excited when a student asks a question, or a student has an interest in something. The papers are very good- at least the ones I get. The students are really interested in it. So it makes it fun.

Dr. Angela Manos:
I think they can expect to get a lot of positive feedback and a lot of knowledge that they will use on the ground. And a lot of our students are already in that line of work. So I use them as much as I can to talk to the other students. Say, "You've experienced this, how do you find it to be?" And I think that helps a lot. Cause students like to learn from those who actually are doing it at the time.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure, yeah. And just to wrap up here, what would you say, as far as fulfillment- what do you get the most fulfillment and enjoyment out of when it comes to teaching?

Dr. Angela Manos:
It makes me feel alive and it makes me feel like I'm doing something good for the world-

Greg Lindberg:
Nice.

Dr. Angela Manos:
It's a gift to me.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely. That's a great way to put it and great to hear. Well, once again we've been speaking with Dr. Angela Manos here on the Saint Leo 360 podcast. And Dr. Manos, I just want to thank you so much for your time and insight and sharing your life story with us. Really appreciate it.

Dr. Angela Manos:
Well thank you, Greg. I appreciate you talking to me.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely. Alrighty.

Dr. Angela Manos:
All right. Bye-bye.

Greg Lindberg:
Take care. Bye now.

Speaker 1:
To hear more episodes of the Saint Leo 360 podcast visit saintleo.edu/podcast. To learn more about Saint Leo's programs and services, call: 877-622-2009, or visit saintleo.edu.

Episode Summary

In this episode of the Saint Leo 360 podcast, 32-year Army veteran and Saint Leo University criminal justice professor Dr. Angela Manos is our guest. Dr. Manos spoke about:

  • Growing up in a military family that constantly moved due to her dad serving in the U.S. Navy
  • How she was one of the first females to go through basic training and serve in a unit with men in the Army’s Military Police Corps
  • Serving several deployments in third-world countries
  • Her 18-month deployment to Afghanistan
  • How she and her comrades supported each other in the military, including the wives of her fellow male soldiers
  • What she learned most from her military service
  • Receiving a Purple Heart and a combat action badge
  • Her post-military life and involvement in the Wounded Warrior Project and other organizations
  • How she got into teaching for Saint Leo University as an adjunct instructor and then as a full-time professor
  • Teaching in Saint Leo’s criminal justice degree programs online
  • Her involvement in Saint Leo’s Criminal Justice Association online group
  • What prospective students can expect out of Saint Leo’s online criminal justice degree programs

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