Skip to main content
online degree program - how online learning works
educating armed forces and veterans
Contact Admissions for how to enroll at Saint Leo University.
Contact Admissions to discuss financial aid options.
Click here to schedule a campus visit!
Learn more about how to start an online degree today!
image showing top half of building on Saint Leo University's campus

Saint Leo 360 Podcast

Episode 44: Highlighting Saint Leo’s BA in Theatre Degree Program

Posted by Greg Lindberg on September 14, 2021
Episode 44: Highlighting Saint Leo’s BA in Theatre Degree Program

Download Episode 44 Transcript

Speaker 1:
Saint Leo 360, a 360 degree overview of the Saint Leo University community.

Greg Lindberg:
Hi there. Thanks for checking out another episode of the Saint Leo 360 podcast. As usual this is your host here with you, Greg Lindberg. On this episode of the podcast, we are speaking about our bachelor of arts in theater program here at Saint Leo university. I'm very thrilled to welcome our guests to this episode. Her name is Dr. Alicia Corts and she is an associate professor of theater here at Saint Leo and also the director of the theater program. Dr. Corts, welcome.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Thank you very much, Greg, for having me. I appreciate you having me on the podcast.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely. Very excited to speak about this. A very cool program. I must say one of our cooler programs, performing arts is a lot of fun and a very exciting field. So I think we're going to have a lot of fun on this podcast.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure. So first off, Dr. Corts, if you want to just give a kind of a personal bio of yourself, your background and perhaps your career before getting into teaching.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely. So I've been at theater since I was five years old. I was a swan in a school play and it just kind of went from there. My family is a very theatrical family. I'm not the only person in my family with a PhD of theater, which is an unusual thing, but I think it's really important to tell stories. I think the stories that we tell help connect us to each other. So in my life, I have gone from being a swan in a little school play to working with members of the Royal Shakespeare company, doing design and directing work in Shanghai and Prague and London, working in New York, in Chicago and some in Minneapolis, some of the big theater towns and being able to do this with really talented people and doing really wonderful stories, that impact people's lives. So for me, that's why I do theater. I do theater because I know it can help us see each other in a better way. So that's what I love about it and that's why I do it.

Greg Lindberg:
Wow. Very cool. And hey, what a background. It sounds like you've had, working all over the world.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely. It's a really interesting thing. I think when you begin to open up your mind to stories that aren't American and what does that look like and what are we telling and how does that work? It's exciting to be able to bring those experiences back to people at Saint Leo and say, "Hey, there's something beyond this." It helps expand their worldview and give them some idea of things that they can do in their lives that's really outside of what they thought was possible.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely very well said. As far as teaching goes, talk to me about your journey into teaching and how you actually came to Saint Leo University.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
This is an interesting question because when I was an undergrad, if you had told me I was going to be a teacher, I would have laughed at you and said, "No way, there's no way I'm going to be a teacher." It's something that I believe I was led to, divinely. When I left college, I did the thing that a lot of people do. I worked at Starbucks, which doesn't sound like it should be the first step on a journey. But back in those days, Starbucks had corporate trainers. I was in my job as a barista making coffee for about two weeks before my manager said, "You know what? I think you'd be a really good trainer." And I said, "I don't know about that. I don't know about that." And she said, "No, no, no, really. Why don't you do it."

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So I became a trainer for Starbucks and I taught people coffee. I still love Starbucks by the way, but it was the first step in a, "Wow, this is kind of fun, but I don't really want to teach coffee. I want to teach something else." So that was kind of the first inkling that I had, that maybe teaching would be something interesting. I then went on and became the producer of a nationally syndicated radio program called Decision Today. So I took a few years off to be a part of that program. And then when that program came to an end, I thought, you know I really enjoyed teaching. Maybe I should be a high school theater teacher, that way I could teach and I could do shows, but also I could do theater, which I love. I had been doing all along, right along while I was doing the radio show.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So I went back to school for my master's degree in education, and I learned to teach and almost immediately went, "Not, I want to teach college theater. That's what I want to do." So I went in and I got my PhD at the University of Georgia in theater, film, and performance studies. I taught at Anderson University. I taught at the University of Georgia. And then I came here to Saint Leo University to basically revitalize a program that had disappeared, which was a sad thing. People at Saint Leo recognized that and wanted to bring it back and so we have.

Greg Lindberg:
Very interesting.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
We had nationally renowned arts programs. We had dance and music and theater. We had a wonderful facility and then it just disappeared. There were budget cuts, the majors were cut and it disappeared, but it affected the culture of Saint Leo and people recognize that and said, "When you get rid of the arts in a university setting, you lose something that is intangibly important to the culture of a school and to the culture of the way that we interact with each other." When you have a theater, you can tell the stories of people who feel marginalized in the theater, in the university community. That's really important because when we can start to understand each other, we help students look beyond what they think is reality and challenge them to think more about how they can make a difference in the world. So for me, this idea that we're going to be able to bring back the theater program, to bring back the BA and bring that out into Saint Leo's community. We're doing something that's going to affect Saint Leo for decades to come.

Greg Lindberg:
Right, very well said. And then, so in terms of this current bachelors in theater program, just talk to me about and how long we've offered it. I believe it is predominantly offered on university campus, correct?

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely. So this is, for now based on the university campus. What we have done with this program is really thought about the needs of a Saint Leo students specifically. There's lots of theater programs out there, and what they really talk about is, "Hey, let's get you to Broadway," or, "Hey, let's get you to LA, let's get you to the film industry. Let's think about that." But really what a BA in theater does is something that I don't think a lot of theater programs really talk about. That is we have an extraordinary set of skills. When you're a theater artist, if you can make a show, you have all sorts of things that employers are dying to find in an employee. You have time management skills, you have creative thinking skills. You have the ability to communicate with other people in a way, that is just easy and natural.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
You can make presentations that are understandable and engage an audience. We are the ones people are dying to hire. So one of the things that we've done with this particular program is we have thought about ways that we can encourage students, not only to think about theater as a career option, but also to recognize that a career in theater takes some time to get into, very rarely do you leave a BA in theater anywhere from any program and end up having the first beautiful career on Broadway. Very few people go and win a Tony off of their first show. So what you have to do instead is you have to be ready to go out into the work world and find yourself a position that also allows you to do your art.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So what we very specifically do in our program is we have a class called practical skills in theater, that meets every semester. What we do in that course is we work on outside projects. So things that really don't have a lot to do with the theater, we'll do things like work on advertising for another company or for another theater. We've got have plans to go into to schools and work with them. With the idea in mind that we're thinking about using our theatrical skills differently in different areas and being able to talk about them in business language. So, for example, when you're working on advertising at another entity, you're actually thinking about marketing, and you're thinking about how you're presenting yourself. You're thinking about some of those ways that you can do that. We've had students go out and get jobs as content creators, as content managers for companies, because they've done that work and practical skills.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So that's the kind of thing that we're thinking about with this BA in theater is how do we help students get a really good job after graduation, but also be able to do their art. One of the things also that we have with the theater program is we have created our curriculum based on the standards of the National Association of Schools of Theater. We're moving towards accreditation under that particular entity, because our theater is excellent, but so is this idea of, we understand what we're giving to our students, and we want to make sure they're ready and prepared for when they go out into the world.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure. That's a great point just about the broad skill set students can obtain through this type of program. A lot of people just might assume, you're going to be acting on stage whatnot, but there's so many career tracks, fields, and so many skills students can learn from this program to do such a variety of things.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely. I think one of the things, not just in theater, but I think in the liberal arts in general, that we haven't done a great job of is we haven't really marketed that to people. We gave you skills that will just absolutely drive not only who you are as a person, but drive your career and the liberal arts, with Saint Leo, with all of our university exploration courses, that's really what we're doing is we're giving students these skills that absolutely give them an edge in the world. It gives them that little bit of something that makes employers stand up and take notice. That's really something that you can't put a price tag on.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely. No question about that. In terms of prospective students, obviously traditional aged students, I would imagine, would be those entering this program. But talk to me about, maybe their backgrounds, their interests, perhaps students that you've already taught, who've been in the program.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely. So of course, we get students who are interested in theater right away. Obviously, you always have those kids, who come in and they're absolutely sure of what they want to do and they're ready to go. Those are terrific. We love them and it's absolutely a terrific program for them. I think the type of student, that I really love are the types of students who come in and go, "I don't know if theater is an option for me. I don't know if I can get a job. I don't know if this is viable me. I love theater, but I just, I don't know. I'm not good enough for Broadway. I'm not good enough for LA." I love changing their minds because that's the real ticket, theater is a viable. We have done a poor job of allowing that starving artist myth to continue.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
We're not starving artists. We're out there getting jobs, we're out there changing lives. We're out there doing all sorts of things. Theater doesn't just mean that you're going to be on stage. It doesn't mean that you're just going to be on film. It means that you could be working behind the scenes. It means that you could be doing an extraordinary amount of careers, that you probably haven't even thought of before. That really goes down to this idea of calling. I think in our current cultural climate, we have this idea somehow that a college degree is going to give you an entry way into a career and you'll stay in that career forever and you'll retire from that career. That whole point of a career is to feed you and put a roof over your head.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
There's got to be more than that in life. You have to do what you love and your job should be something that you go to and you know not only is it something that you find personally fulfilling, but it's something that's also changing other people's lives. That's what I think the BA in theater is very much arranged around. Our goal is to help our students find their calling. Once they find that calling, then define the skills that help them to move forward and to fulfill that calling that they have in their lives.

Greg Lindberg:
Right. Very interesting. Let's dive a little further into the curriculum, some of the courses, I know you did reference one of the kind of intro courses, I guess earlier. But talk to me about just some other specific courses and topics covered in this program.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So one of the things about the BA in theater, when you're under the National Associations of Schools of Theater, is that it's a very general degree. So there are three different areas of theater that we want to make sure every student gets a little bit of a taste of. So in the freshman year, students take acting one, they take script analysis and they take stagecraft, which is the technical theater side of things. With the idea in mind that they understand a little bit about performance, a little bit about technical theater and a little bit about the dramaturgy or the history, literature and creation of theater side. By doing that, then they get a little taste of each one of those things, and then they in conversation with their advisor, me or another faculty member, talk then about, "Okay, so what is it that I want to focus on? What do I feel myself being drawn to?"

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Then we tailor their selection of classes to one of those three tracks. So if they want to be technical theater, they might take lighting and costuming, design, that kind of thing. If they're in performance, they continue with acting and movement. If you're in history, literature and creation, they're taking more classes in things like, modern and modern contemporary works and things like that and play writing so that they get into this idea that they are exploring that. The theater major is very open for that. So they can take whatever classes they want in between those three initial classes and their senior seminar. So they have a lot of options of how they want to craft it. And really, we want to be very personalized with that. So talking to people, thinking about what's helpful for them.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
I have a student right now, who's very interested in creating an afterschool program for Hispanic children. So when she's thinking about this, she's thinking about, "Okay, I need to take a little bit of performance. I need to be aware of technical theater because I'm going to need to be helping them with that." So we're thinking very carefully about how we're crafting a program to move people forward and what they want to do after they leave. At the same time, we have these practical skills courses, that we have every single semester, and it's sort of a series that helps them build a website. They build two different resumes. So they build a work resume and a theatrical resume. As each semester, we just add a little bit to that, so that they're crafting their identity as a theater person and as a person, who's going to move into the world.

Greg Lindberg:
Interesting. That's wonderful that they really kind of get to customize in a way their track, their interests, and really hone in on what they want to study.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely. I think that's one of the real keys that I like about NAST and the way that they credit programs is that it makes it very clear for the student, what they're trying to do. I think that's really always a surprise to students, who arrive for the theater program. Because they go, "Whoa, you mean I have to start making choices about my life." "Yeah, you do." And you do it from the very beginning. So we're not making any assumptions necessarily about what they want to do. It can grow with them over the four years as they begin to explore things and realize, "Oh, I like this, but not that." We can really have that relational conversation about how does this affect what you might want to do. Let's explore some things that you might find really interesting. I know that one of the things that people have found, that has really been surprising is that they really love working with kids.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
We've done some work with doing camps for kids. We did it specifically online when the pandemic hit. I had several students who got very excited. They didn't think that they wanted to work with kids, but then they did it and they thought, "Wow, I like this. This is something I want to do." Terrific. Let's start moving you in that direction and see what we can for you. So that's another benefit of having that practical skills courses. People think, "Oh, I don't know. I don't know if I want to do this outside project." And then they do it and they get very excited because it triggers something in them. It uses a skill set, they didn't realize they really enjoyed. It gives them an outlook on something that they might really have a great career doing.

Greg Lindberg:
Sure, very eyeopening. It sounds like. As far as the faculty who teach in this program, let's talk about the faculty and just kind of what they bring to the table and their backgrounds.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely. So we have, I'm the only full-time theater professor, but we do have a wonderful array of adjuncts, Ami Sallee, who has her MFA in performance, very, very active member of the Tampa theater community and absolute gem, who has real insight and not only into how acting works as a professional, but also how that can work outside of the acting profession. How you can use those acting skills outside. We also have Keenan Bearcat, who is a costume designer who works with a cruise line as a designer and if you had a technical worker. So he brings a lot of interesting insight into what technical theater kids can do.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
We're looking to expand that. So, when we bring people in, we're looking for faculty who bring not only their professional experience, but that understanding of how that works within the world and what conversations we can have about, what are the possibilities? I mean, I think a lot of people might not think of working on a cruise ship necessarily right off the bat, but what a wonderful way of using your theatrical skills and seeing the world at the same time. So terrific.

Greg Lindberg:
Oh yeah. What a neat background.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Yeah, it's really interesting. Again, I think people have this really hard understanding of what theater major does, we're working in a restaurant and not on stage, or we're a famous celebrity and there is so much in between that is possible that I think once people realize, "Hey, there is a lot of possibility here." It really helps them to understand that this is more than just something that you do as a hobby. This is something you can do for your life.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely. Very true. So I know we have covered several different career tracks, but if you want to mention a few more, and then in addition to that, in terms of community connections, internship, professional development opportunities, I understand that our students do have a lot of opportunities on those fronts as well.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So one of the things I want to think about here as we start to talk about career opportunities is that very few people will stay in the same career for their entire career. I mean, when I think about my own career, I mean, I started with Starbucks and then I went to radio and then I went to high school teaching and now here I am at the university level. Your career will morph and change. So I really want to make sure that the students understand not only what they want to do for a career, but also the skillset that they have, because that makes them incredibly flexible and really recession proof. Because there will be times when a career comes along and it sounds great and it's wonderful. Then something like a novel Corona virus comes along and you lose your job.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
People who don't really understand their skillset then are terrified. Like, "What am I going to do?" What I'm trying to instill in my students is, "Okay, that means I need to go back to my skillset. And now I need to go hunting for that skillset and be ready to move and move quickly." I'm finding that's working as we go through and we have graduates going out into the world. Lots of different careers that people have done from the theater. We have a lot of teachers, a lot of people moving into the teaching realm. Now that's generally those like a stepping stone into other careers as well, but taking some time to teach us a great thing. We have students who are pursuing arts therapy, who are thinking about using the arts as a way of helping people understand their own lives and explore healing.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
We have people who have moved into technical theater work. So people who are working at Busch Gardens, working at Universal, who are working towards going into graduate school for those things. We also have people, who are working as voiceover artists at the same time, which has really terrific. A lot of times what we find is we have students who are working, but they're also working on the side as theater people. Voiceover work is a wonderful way, and we have a real emphasis in that, not only in the curriculum, but in the way that we encourage people. So that's been a fabulous thing as well. There are so many career opportunities so that our graduates haven't explored.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
One of the great ways of doing these things is that once you have the abilities in theater, you can start to see all sorts of connections to things. Technical theater artists who can design sets, and really think about, what is this set saying? How is it communicating to an audience? They're fantastic at things like staging houses in real estate. I mean, that's a really, that's an odd connection, but it works really well. There's a lot of money to be made in that particular realm. So that's one of the things that we keep focusing on is keep thinking outside the box, where can this work for you? How could your skillset work in this particular way?

Greg Lindberg:
Right. All great points. Yeah, once again, a career track right there, you just mentioned, I never would have envisioned a theater major being a good fit for, but think about just presenting in front of others. Sales, perhaps even, I mean, there's so many routes and avenues.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Oh, people are the best salespeople. We are the best salespeople because we can transform ourselves into who ever needs to be there to sell the product. Right? I mean, you know, when you think about a sales network, they're hiring actors to sell those things, and it's awesome and it works out terrific. So it's a really interesting thing, I think. When you start to think about the skillset of actors and technicians and historians and all the different ways that theater works, we have a pretty amazing set of skills and we can really go in all kinds of different areas.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely. Then if a student graduate, let's say of this program, we're interested in pursuing a master's degree, graduate studies, what kind of routes out there, are specific to performing arts, fine arts?

Dr. Alicia Corts:
The performing arts has, if they're focusing solely on performing arts, they're looking at an MFA generally in acting design, those kinds of areas, or they're looking at the MA PhD route, if they're thinking about sort of the behind the scenes, teaching at the college level of that kind of thing, and there are a wealth of those programs available. But what we're finding is, we're actually finding that our students, because they're thinking about this different skill set are also pursuing other kinds of graduate degrees. They're pursuing MBAs to think about theater administration and moving into fine arts administration. We've also had a student who went in and got her masters of arts in library studies specifically to become a fine arts librarian, because she began to see these connections between things that she wanted to pursue. So the beautiful thing about a theater degree is that it gives you a lot of skills that move you into a space that you can think about other graduate degrees.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
I have a former student not from Saint Leo who just went into law school. I actually have a bunch of, I know a lot of theater students, who've gone into law after getting their BA in theater. I mean, who would you want representing you in the courtroom, but somebody who's really great at presenting themselves in an argument and theater people can do that really well. We have that skillset. So there's a lot of graduate opportunities for a BA in theater. So the nice thing about that is that, students who think, "Oh, I love being on stage. I love making costumes. I love thinking about this." They're not relegated to just doing theater. They can have a different career than just being on stage. It can be something that evolves for them as they move through their life.

Greg Lindberg:
Definitely, for sure. I know you have mentioned, kind of generally alumni who have moved on from this program graduated and gone on to a variety of careers. I did want to give you the chance to mention either by name or just kind of in general, any additional alumni specifically, or that have a yeah, great stories.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
We are a very young degree. We have only been around for about three years. So when we're talking about alumni success stories, you have to understand we're still pretty baby and new about this. But even still, one of the things that I point to that I am really, really proud of is that we have a 100% rate of finding a really great job or getting into graduate school immediately after graduation. That's pretty amazing. When you think about the fact that, here we are, and it's a BA in theater, but students are working. What I like about it too, is that they're working with are also working on their art at the same time. So even if they're doing something like they're teaching, they have something that they're doing as well, like voiceover work, that is helping them move forward and continue their artistry.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
We have students with multiple, multiple audio books on Audible, people who are doing voiceover work in LA because one of the beauties of voiceover work is you can do it from anywhere. So they're moving forward in their career. I have a student who, Ariel Winter from Modern Family just dropped out of a project. One of my students got it instead and we're only three years old. So the beauty of this is I look at this and "Go, man, what are my students going to do?" Because we're already exploding though. It's really very exciting. I think also really helpful when you have parents who go, "Why are you getting a BA in theater? You need to get something like a BA in business. How are you going to live?" Then be able to say, "No, your students, not only going to be able to do this, they're going to be able to do it and do it at a really high level, really soon after graduation."

Greg Lindberg:
And then just kind of putting a bow on the program, just summarizing here. What would you say really separates this bachelors in theater program from others out there?

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So I've already talked a little bit about this, focus on the skill set and all of that and that's certainly one of the big foci of what we do. But it's a couple of other things that set us apart in the way that we do theater. For one thing, when a person graduates from this program, I want them to be able to make theater all by themselves. A lot of places when they focus on something like acting might not give them an opportunity to do things like work backstage or direct or do that kind of thing.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
But instead, what I want to give people is a chance to understand how they could craft a story and put it out for an audience and be able to have all the skills they need to in order to make that happen. If you think about someone, like if you move into teaching, as several of my students have done, that's actually something that you're going to need to be able to do all these little things to make sure that this the show gets going, or at least have an understanding of those skills so that you can help guide parents, who might be helping you to get that done.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So our program sets is, we kind of are apart from other programs and very much a focus on let's make sure you can do that when you leave so that you can make theater and make that happen for yourself. Another thing that we have that I think is really exciting is I went to the National Endowment for the Humanities, Digital Technologies and Theater and Performance. One of the things that came out of that is a specialized class designed to help students understand the cutting edge of media and digital things like virtual reality, augmented reality, and how that works in performance and what that can do. That class is really unique to Saint Leo. There's very few other schools that have that kind of focus. So that's wonderful. We also have a real focus on devised theater, which means creating theater within a community to help bring out stories that are important for that group, that can help a lot with things like social justice and community activism.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So we run that class every once in a while. When we do that, we're actually moving towards a performance that speaks to the community at Saint Leo, we did Belong, which was a show that took the Sandhill review and took those poems and stories and created something out of that. We also did Women on the Move, which was at the story and history of the Benedictine sisters on campus, whose former chapel is our theater and it was their story. It was just wonderful and exciting to be able to tell the story that was important to Saint Leo and show students how that could work.

Greg Lindberg:
Wow. Very interesting. Then just one final question here, in terms of the COVID-19 pandemic, kind of we have referenced a little bit here in the conversation, certainly this has taken its whole on many fields, including performing arts. I'm just curious your perspective on kind of where we stand now and moving forward in terms of this field and opportunities in the field.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So it is a wonderfully interesting moment, isn't it? Because theater is in-person, we had to make some changes obviously, immediately, when the pandemic hit. We went from being in person and planning an in-person performance of Belong to switching that to be an online version only. Having that be something, shifted immediately, but that is I think an opportunity rather than something that we have to mourn and say, "Well, that's another thing." In devised theater, we think of everything as a resource and resources are neutral. So our resource was going to be an in-person performance that resources shifted to an online performance, but that then changes how we think about things. I think the pandemic has done a wonderful thing in a lot of ways, because it has forced our students to use the flexibility, that I was talking about before. You have to have a different skillset and you have to be ready for change.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Well, here we are, we had to change and we have to keep changing. With the Delta variant, we have, we have two performances planned for this fall in person. We'll see how this goes, who knows. We may not be able to do that. We had to plan them outside. Instead of being in the theater, we're going to be outside. That's a shift and we have to remain flexible. Things will come along always, that change your mind and change the way you think. But for me, I have been very excited about the opportunities, that affords our students to be able to see that you can keep going, that you can shift your perspective, that you can change things around that you can keep being that moldable, flexible worker who changes according to what it is, and still get across what you need to get across, which I think is really important.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So that's fantastic. Now, as far as the future, I think a lot of theaters are having conversations right now about how do we keep some of the things that we've really enjoyed. I mean, some of these theaters have done a really, really wonderful work that they've been able to share with a much wider audience than they have before. I've been watching wonderful theater from London and Prague, and a lot of other places overseas. I can never get to unless I get on a plane and go.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
So we're having a lot of conversations about what that looks like and how we can change and how we can move that forward. That's affected us at Saint Leo as well. How can we do this in a way that could be something that we do for people who can't make it to our in-person performances. So rather than thinking about the pandemic as a, "Oh man, we lost so much," I think it's really important. Especially for theater people to say, this is an opportunity and we need to take it and we need to move forward with it and really embrace the changes that have been in place.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely, very well said. I know, I remember a faculty member once told me, "Students, they have to be comfortable with the uncomfortable."

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Absolutely. I love that. I always tell students, if you don't feel uncomfortable in this program, at some point, then you are not doing it right. Not doing it right, because this is designed to take you out of your comfort zone and find out what the world has to offer you. Because if you just sit in your little hole in the wall an hope for the best. Well, then that's all you're going to get, but there's so much more.

Greg Lindberg:
All right, well again, we've been chatting with Dr. Alicia Corts here on the Saint Leo 360 podcast, and Dr. Cortes just want to thank you so much for your time, for your perspective, really appreciate it. Thank you so much for being a guest here with us.

Dr. Alicia Corts:
Thank you so much, Greg. This has been a wonderful opportunity and I so appreciate you and what you do.

Greg Lindberg:
Absolutely already. Thanks so much.

Speaker 1:
To hear more episodes of the Saint Leo 360 podcast visit saintleo.edu forward slash podcast to learn more about Saint Leo's programs and services. Call 8-7-7-6-2-2-2-0-0-9, or visit saintleo.edu.

Episode Summary

In this episode of the Saint Leo 360 podcast, we explore the Bachelor of Arts in theatre degree program offered at Saint Leo University. We visit with Dr. Alicia Corts, an associate professor of theatre and director of the theatre program in Saint Leo’s College of Arts and Sciences. Corts discussed:

  • Her education and professional background
  • How she got into teaching and her journey to Saint Leo University
  • Where the BA in theatre degree program is offered
  • Who this program is intended for
  • An Overview of the courses and topics covered in the curriculum
  • An overview of the faculty who teach in the theatre degree program
  • Career opportunities with a theatre degree
  • Opportunities to pursue graduate studies with this degree
  • Early alumni success stories from this young program
  • What sets this program apart from others
  • How the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the performing arts and how it has actually opened the door to more opportunities for students considering this field in some cases

Links & Resources

Learn more about the Bachelor of Arts in theatre degree program offered by Saint Leo University.

Check out Corts’ faculty bio and contact info on her faculty bio page.

pursue creative writing and english degree

Recent Episodes

Subscribe to Email Updates

Request More Information